Ember.ObjectController Class packages/ember-runtime/lib/controllers/object_controller.js:9


Ember.ObjectController is part of Ember's Controller layer. It is intended to wrap a single object, proxying unhandled attempts to get and set to the underlying model object, and to forward unhandled action attempts to its target.

Ember.ObjectController derives this functionality from its superclass Ember.ObjectProxy and the Ember.ControllerMixin mixin.

Show:

_scheduledDestroy

private

Invoked by the run loop to actually destroy the object. This is scheduled for execution by the destroy method.

addObserver

(key, target, method)

Adds an observer on a property.

This is the core method used to register an observer for a property.

Once you call this method, any time the key's value is set, your observer will be notified. Note that the observers are triggered any time the value is set, regardless of whether it has actually changed. Your observer should be prepared to handle that.

You can also pass an optional context parameter to this method. The context will be passed to your observer method whenever it is triggered. Note that if you add the same target/method pair on a key multiple times with different context parameters, your observer will only be called once with the last context you passed.

Observer Methods

Observer methods you pass should generally have the following signature if you do not pass a context parameter:

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fooDidChange: function(sender, key, value, rev) { };

The sender is the object that changed. The key is the property that changes. The value property is currently reserved and unused. The rev is the last property revision of the object when it changed, which you can use to detect if the key value has really changed or not.

If you pass a context parameter, the context will be passed before the revision like so:

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fooDidChange: function(sender, key, value, context, rev) { };

Usually you will not need the value, context or revision parameters at the end. In this case, it is common to write observer methods that take only a sender and key value as parameters or, if you aren't interested in any of these values, to write an observer that has no parameters at all.

Parameters:

key String
The key to observer
target Object
The target object to invoke
method String|Function
The method to invoke.

beginPropertyChanges

Ember.Observable

Begins a grouping of property changes.

You can use this method to group property changes so that notifications will not be sent until the changes are finished. If you plan to make a large number of changes to an object at one time, you should call this method at the beginning of the changes to begin deferring change notifications. When you are done making changes, call endPropertyChanges() to deliver the deferred change notifications and end deferring.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

cacheFor

(keyName) Object

Returns the cached value of a computed property, if it exists. This allows you to inspect the value of a computed property without accidentally invoking it if it is intended to be generated lazily.

Parameters:

keyName String

Returns:

Object
The cached value of the computed property, if any

child

Container

Returns a new child of the current container. These children are configured to correctly inherit from the current container.

Returns:

Container

controllerFor

deprecated

Use needs instead

create

(arguments) static

Creates an instance of a class. Accepts either no arguments, or an object containing values to initialize the newly instantiated object with.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  helloWorld: function() {
    alert("Hi, my name is " + this.get('name'));
  }
});

var tom = App.Person.create({
  name: 'Tom Dale'
});

tom.helloWorld(); // alerts "Hi, my name is Tom Dale".

create will call the init function if defined during Ember.AnyObject.extend

If no arguments are passed to create, it will not set values to the new instance during initialization:

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var noName = App.Person.create();
noName.helloWorld(); // alerts undefined

NOTE: For performance reasons, you cannot declare methods or computed properties during create. You should instead declare methods and computed properties when using extend or use the createWithMixins shorthand.

Parameters:

arguments []

createWithMixins

(arguments) static

Equivalent to doing extend(arguments).create(). If possible use the normal create method instead.

Parameters:

arguments []

decrementProperty

(keyName, decrement) Number

Set the value of a property to the current value minus some amount.

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player.decrementProperty('lives');
orc.decrementProperty('health', 5);

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to decrement
decrement Number
The amount to decrement by. Defaults to 1

Returns:

Number
The new property value

describe

(fullName) String

A hook that can be used to describe how the resolver will attempt to find the factory.

For example, the default Ember .describe returns the full class name (including namespace) where Ember's resolver expects to find the fullName.

Parameters:

fullName String

Returns:

String
described fullName

destroy

Inherited from Ember.CoreObject but overwritten in packages/container/lib/container.js:583

A depth first traversal, destroying the container, its descendant containers and all their managed objects.

eachComputedProperty

(callback, binding)

Iterate over each computed property for the class, passing its name and any associated metadata (see metaForProperty) to the callback.

Parameters:

callback Function
binding Object

eachLocal

(callback, binding)

Iterate and invoke a callback for each local key-value pair.

Parameters:

callback Function
binding Object

endPropertyChanges

Ember.Observable

Ends a grouping of property changes.

You can use this method to group property changes so that notifications will not be sent until the changes are finished. If you plan to make a large number of changes to an object at one time, you should call beginPropertyChanges() at the beginning of the changes to defer change notifications. When you are done making changes, call this method to deliver the deferred change notifications and end deferring.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

extend

(mixins, arguments) static

Creates a new subclass.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    alert(thing);
   }
});

This defines a new subclass of Ember.Object: App.Person. It contains one method: say().

You can also create a subclass from any existing class by calling its extend() method. For example, you might want to create a subclass of Ember's built-in Ember.View class:

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App.PersonView = Ember.View.extend({
  tagName: 'li',
  classNameBindings: ['isAdministrator']
});

When defining a subclass, you can override methods but still access the implementation of your parent class by calling the special _super() method:

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    var name = this.get('name');
    alert(name + ' says: ' + thing);
  }
});

App.Soldier = App.Person.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    this._super(thing + ", sir!");
  },
  march: function(numberOfHours) {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' marches for ' + numberOfHours + ' hours.')
  }
});

var yehuda = App.Soldier.create({
  name: "Yehuda Katz"
});

yehuda.say("Yes");  // alerts "Yehuda Katz says: Yes, sir!"

The create() on line #17 creates an instance of the App.Soldier class. The extend() on line #8 creates a subclass of App.Person. Any instance of the App.Person class will not have the march() method.

You can also pass Mixin classes to add additional properties to the subclass.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' says: ' + thing);
  }
});

App.SingingMixin = Mixin.create({
  sing: function(thing){
    alert(this.get('name') + ' sings: la la la ' + thing);
  }
});

App.BroadwayStar = App.Person.extend(App.SingingMixin, {
  dance: function() {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' dances: tap tap tap tap ');
  }
});

The App.BroadwayStar class contains three methods: say(), sing(), and dance().

Parameters:

mixins [Mixin]
One or more Mixin classes
arguments [Object]
Object containing values to use within the new class

factoryInjection

(factoryName, property, injectionName)

Defines factory injection rules.

Similar to regular injection rules, but are run against factories, via Container#lookupFactory.

These rules are used to inject objects onto factories when they are looked up.

Two forms of injections are possible:

  • Injecting one fullName on another fullName
  • Injecting one fullName on a type

Example:

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var container = new Container();

container.register('store:main', Store);
container.register('store:secondary', OtherStore);
container.register('model:user', User);
container.register('model:post', Post);

// injecting one fullName on another type
container.factoryInjection('model', 'store', 'store:main');

// injecting one fullName on another fullName
container.factoryInjection('model:post', 'secondaryStore', 'store:secondary');

var UserFactory = container.lookupFactory('model:user');
var PostFactory = container.lookupFactory('model:post');
var store = container.lookup('store:main');

UserFactory.store instanceof Store; //=> true
UserFactory.secondaryStore instanceof OtherStore; //=> false

PostFactory.store instanceof Store; //=> true
PostFactory.secondaryStore instanceof OtherStore; //=> true

// and both models share the same source instance
UserFactory.store === PostFactory.store; //=> true

Parameters:

factoryName String
property String
injectionName String

factoryTypeInjection

(type, property, fullName) private

Used only via factoryInjection.

Provides a specialized form of injection, specifically enabling all factory of one type to be injected with a reference to another object.

For example, provided each factory of type model needed a store. one would do the following:

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var container = new Container();

container.register('store:main', SomeStore);

container.factoryTypeInjection('model', 'store', 'store:main');

var store = container.lookup('store:main');
var UserFactory = container.lookupFactory('model:user');

UserFactory.store instanceof SomeStore; //=> true

Parameters:

type String
property String
fullName String

get

(key) Any

Retrieve the value given a key, if the value is present at the current level use it, otherwise walk up the parent hierarchy and try again. If no matching key is found, return undefined.

Parameters:

key String

Returns:

Any

getProperties

(list) Hash

To get multiple properties at once, call getProperties with a list of strings or an array:

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record.getProperties('firstName', 'lastName', 'zipCode');
// { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe', zipCode: '10011' }

is equivalent to:

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record.getProperties(['firstName', 'lastName', 'zipCode']);
// { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe', zipCode: '10011' }

Parameters:

list String...|Array
of keys to get

Returns:

Hash

getWithDefault

(keyName, defaultValue) Object

Retrieves the value of a property, or a default value in the case that the property returns undefined.

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person.getWithDefault('lastName', 'Doe');

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to retrieve
defaultValue Object
The value to return if the property value is undefined

Returns:

Object
The property value or the defaultValue.

has

(key) Boolean

Check for the existence of given a key, if the key is present at the current level return true, otherwise walk up the parent hierarchy and try again. If no matching key is found, return false.

Parameters:

key String

Returns:

Boolean

hasObserverFor

(key) Boolean

Returns true if the object currently has observers registered for a particular key. You can use this method to potentially defer performing an expensive action until someone begins observing a particular property on the object.

Parameters:

key String
Key to check

Returns:

Boolean

incrementProperty

(keyName, increment) Number

Set the value of a property to the current value plus some amount.

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person.incrementProperty('age');
team.incrementProperty('score', 2);

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to increment
increment Number
The amount to increment by. Defaults to 1

Returns:

Number
The new property value

init

An overridable method called when objects are instantiated. By default, does nothing unless it is overridden during class definition.

Example:

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  init: function() {
    alert('Name is ' + this.get('name'));
  }
});

var steve = App.Person.create({
  name: "Steve"
});

// alerts 'Name is Steve'.

NOTE: If you do override init for a framework class like Ember.View or Ember.ArrayController, be sure to call this._super() in your init declaration! If you don't, Ember may not have an opportunity to do important setup work, and you'll see strange behavior in your application.

injection

(factoryName, property, injectionName)

Defines injection rules.

These rules are used to inject dependencies onto objects when they are instantiated.

Two forms of injections are possible:

  • Injecting one fullName on another fullName
  • Injecting one fullName on a type

Example:

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var container = new Container();

container.register('source:main', Source);
container.register('model:user', User);
container.register('model:post', Post);

// injecting one fullName on another fullName
// eg. each user model gets a post model
container.injection('model:user', 'post', 'model:post');

// injecting one fullName on another type
container.injection('model', 'source', 'source:main');

var user = container.lookup('model:user');
var post = container.lookup('model:post');

user.source instanceof Source; //=> true
post.source instanceof Source; //=> true

user.post instanceof Post; //=> true

// and both models share the same source
user.source === post.source; //=> true

Parameters:

factoryName String
property String
injectionName String

lookup

(fullName, options) Any

Given a fullName return a corresponding instance.

The default behaviour is for lookup to return a singleton instance. The singleton is scoped to the container, allowing multiple containers to all have their own locally scoped singletons.

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var container = new Container();
container.register('api:twitter', Twitter);

var twitter = container.lookup('api:twitter');

twitter instanceof Twitter; // => true

// by default the container will return singletons
var twitter2 = container.lookup('api:twitter');
twitter2 instanceof Twitter; // => true

twitter === twitter2; //=> true

If singletons are not wanted an optional flag can be provided at lookup.

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var container = new Container();
container.register('api:twitter', Twitter);

var twitter = container.lookup('api:twitter', { singleton: false });
var twitter2 = container.lookup('api:twitter', { singleton: false });

twitter === twitter2; //=> false

Parameters:

fullName String
options Object

Returns:

Any

lookupFactory

(fullName) Any

Given a fullName return the corresponding factory.

Parameters:

fullName String

Returns:

Any

makeToString

(factory, fullName) Function

Parameters:

factory Any
fullName String

Returns:

Function
toString function

metaForProperty

(key)

In some cases, you may want to annotate computed properties with additional metadata about how they function or what values they operate on. For example, computed property functions may close over variables that are then no longer available for introspection.

You can pass a hash of these values to a computed property like this:

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person: function() {
  var personId = this.get('personId');
  return App.Person.create({ id: personId });
}.property().meta({ type: App.Person })

Once you've done this, you can retrieve the values saved to the computed property from your class like this:

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MyClass.metaForProperty('person');

This will return the original hash that was passed to meta().

Parameters:

key String
property name

normalize

(fullName) String

A hook to enable custom fullName normalization behaviour

Parameters:

fullName String

Returns:

String
normalized fullName

notifyPropertyChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Convenience method to call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange in succession.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key to be notified about.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

options

(type, options)

Parameters:

type String
options Object

optionsForType

(type, options)

Allow registering options for all factories of a type.

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var container = new Container();

// if all of type `connection` must not be singletons
container.optionsForType('connection', { singleton: false });

container.register('connection:twitter', TwitterConnection);
container.register('connection:facebook', FacebookConnection);

var twitter = container.lookup('connection:twitter');
var twitter2 = container.lookup('connection:twitter');

twitter === twitter2; // => false

var facebook = container.lookup('connection:facebook');
var facebook2 = container.lookup('connection:facebook');

facebook === facebook2; // => false

Parameters:

type String
options Object

propertyDidChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Notify the observer system that a property has just changed.

Sometimes you need to change a value directly or indirectly without actually calling get() or set() on it. In this case, you can use this method and propertyWillChange() instead. Calling these two methods together will notify all observers that the property has potentially changed value.

Note that you must always call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange as a pair. If you do not, it may get the property change groups out of order and cause notifications to be delivered more often than you would like.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key that has just changed.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

propertyWillChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Notify the observer system that a property is about to change.

Sometimes you need to change a value directly or indirectly without actually calling get() or set() on it. In this case, you can use this method and propertyDidChange() instead. Calling these two methods together will notify all observers that the property has potentially changed value.

Note that you must always call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange as a pair. If you do not, it may get the property change groups out of order and cause notifications to be delivered more often than you would like.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key that is about to change.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

register

(fullName, factory, options)

Registers a factory for later injection.

Example:

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var container = new Container();

container.register('model:user', Person, {singleton: false });
container.register('fruit:favorite', Orange);
container.register('communication:main', Email, {singleton: false});

Parameters:

fullName String
factory Function
options Object

remove

(key)

Delete the given key

Parameters:

key String

removeObserver

(key, target, method)

Remove an observer you have previously registered on this object. Pass the same key, target, and method you passed to addObserver() and your target will no longer receive notifications.

Parameters:

key String
The key to observer
target Object
The target object to invoke
method String|Function
The method to invoke.

reopen

Augments a constructor's prototype with additional properties and functions:

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MyObject = Ember.Object.extend({
  name: 'an object'
});

o = MyObject.create();
o.get('name'); // 'an object'

MyObject.reopen({
  say: function(msg){
    console.log(msg);
  }
})

o2 = MyObject.create();
o2.say("hello"); // logs "hello"

o.say("goodbye"); // logs "goodbye"

To add functions and properties to the constructor itself, see reopenClass

reopenClass

Augments a constructor's own properties and functions:

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MyObject = Ember.Object.extend({
  name: 'an object'
});

MyObject.reopenClass({
  canBuild: false
});

MyObject.canBuild; // false
o = MyObject.create();

In other words, this creates static properties and functions for the class. These are only available on the class and not on any instance of that class.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  name : "",
  sayHello : function(){
    alert("Hello. My name is " + this.get('name'));
  }
});

App.Person.reopenClass({
  species : "Homo sapiens",
  createPerson: function(newPersonsName){
    return App.Person.create({
      name:newPersonsName
    });
  }
});

var tom = App.Person.create({
  name : "Tom Dale"
});
var yehuda = App.Person.createPerson("Yehuda Katz");

tom.sayHello(); // "Hello. My name is Tom Dale"
yehuda.sayHello(); // "Hello. My name is Yehuda Katz"
alert(App.Person.species); // "Homo sapiens"

Note that species and createPerson are not valid on the tom and yehuda variables. They are only valid on App.Person.

To add functions and properties to instances of a constructor by extending the constructor's prototype see reopen

replaceRoute

(name, models)

Transition into another route while replacing the current URL, if possible. This will replace the current history entry instead of adding a new one. Beside that, it is identical to transitionToRoute in all other respects.

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aController.replaceRoute('blogPosts');
aController.replaceRoute('blogPosts.recentEntries');

Optionally supply a model for the route in question. The model will be serialized into the URL using the serialize hook of the route:

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aController.replaceRoute('blogPost', aPost);

If a literal is passed (such as a number or a string), it will be treated as an identifier instead. In this case, the model hook of the route will be triggered:

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aController.replaceRoute('blogPost', 1);

Multiple models will be applied last to first recursively up the resource tree.

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App.Router.map(function() {
  this.resource('blogPost', {path:':blogPostId'}, function(){
    this.resource('blogComment', {path: ':blogCommentId'});
  });
});

aController.replaceRoute('blogComment', aPost, aComment);
aController.replaceRoute('blogComment', 1, 13);

It is also possible to pass a URL (a string that starts with a /). This is intended for testing and debugging purposes and should rarely be used in production code.

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aController.replaceRoute('/');
aController.replaceRoute('/blog/post/1/comment/13');

Parameters:

name String
the name of the route or a URL
models ...Object
the model(s) or identifier(s) to be used while transitioning to the route.

replaceWith

deprecated

reset

resolve

(fullName) Function

Given a fullName return the corresponding factory.

By default resolve will retrieve the factory from its container's registry.

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var container = new Container();
container.register('api:twitter', Twitter);

container.resolve('api:twitter') // => Twitter

Optionally the container can be provided with a custom resolver. If provided, resolve will first provide the custom resolver the opportunity to resolve the fullName, otherwise it will fallback to the registry.

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var container = new Container();
container.resolver = function(fullName) {
  // lookup via the module system of choice
};

// the twitter factory is added to the module system
container.resolve('api:twitter') // => Twitter

Parameters:

fullName String

Returns:

Function
fullName's factory

send

(actionName, context)

Triggers a named action on the ActionHandler. Any parameters supplied after the actionName string will be passed as arguments to the action target function.

If the ActionHandler has its target property set, actions may bubble to the target. Bubbling happens when an actionName can not be found in the ActionHandler's actions hash or if the action target function returns true.

Example

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App.WelcomeRoute = Ember.Route.extend({
  actions: {
    playTheme: function() {
       this.send('playMusic', 'theme.mp3');
    },
    playMusic: function(track) {
      // ...
    }
  }
});

Parameters:

actionName String
The action to trigger
context *
a context to send with the action

set

(key, value)

Set the given value for the given key, at the current level.

Parameters:

key String
value Any

setProperties

(hash) Ember.Observable

Sets a list of properties at once. These properties are set inside a single beginPropertyChanges and endPropertyChanges batch, so observers will be buffered.

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record.setProperties({ firstName: 'Charles', lastName: 'Jolley' });

Parameters:

hash Hash
the hash of keys and values to set

Returns:

Ember.Observable

toString

String

Returns a string representation which attempts to provide more information than Javascript's toString typically does, in a generic way for all Ember objects.

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App.Person = Em.Object.extend()
person = App.Person.create()
person.toString() //=> "<App.Person:ember1024>"

If the object's class is not defined on an Ember namespace, it will indicate it is a subclass of the registered superclass:

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Student = App.Person.extend()
student = Student.create()
student.toString() //=> "<(subclass of App.Person):ember1025>"

If the method toStringExtension is defined, its return value will be included in the output.

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App.Teacher = App.Person.extend({
  toStringExtension: function() {
    return this.get('fullName');
  }
});
teacher = App.Teacher.create()
teacher.toString(); //=> "<App.Teacher:ember1026:Tom Dale>"

Returns:

String
string representation

toggleProperty

(keyName) Object

Set the value of a boolean property to the opposite of it's current value.

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starship.toggleProperty('warpDriveEngaged');

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to toggle

Returns:

Object
The new property value

transitionTo

deprecated

transitionToRoute

(name, models)

Transition the application into another route. The route may be either a single route or route path:

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aController.transitionToRoute('blogPosts');
aController.transitionToRoute('blogPosts.recentEntries');

Optionally supply a model for the route in question. The model will be serialized into the URL using the serialize hook of the route:

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aController.transitionToRoute('blogPost', aPost);

If a literal is passed (such as a number or a string), it will be treated as an identifier instead. In this case, the model hook of the route will be triggered:

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aController.transitionToRoute('blogPost', 1);

Multiple models will be applied last to first recursively up the resource tree.

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App.Router.map(function() {
  this.resource('blogPost', {path:':blogPostId'}, function(){
    this.resource('blogComment', {path: ':blogCommentId'});
  });
});

aController.transitionToRoute('blogComment', aPost, aComment);
aController.transitionToRoute('blogComment', 1, 13);

It is also possible to pass a URL (a string that starts with a /). This is intended for testing and debugging purposes and should rarely be used in production code.

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aController.transitionToRoute('/');
aController.transitionToRoute('/blog/post/1/comment/13');

See also replaceRoute.

Parameters:

name String
the name of the route or a URL
models ...Object
the model(s) or identifier(s) to be used while transitioning to the route.

typeInjection

(type, property, fullName) private

Used only via injection.

Provides a specialized form of injection, specifically enabling all objects of one type to be injected with a reference to another object.

For example, provided each object of type controller needed a router. one would do the following:

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var container = new Container();

container.register('router:main', Router);
container.register('controller:user', UserController);
container.register('controller:post', PostController);

container.typeInjection('controller', 'router', 'router:main');

var user = container.lookup('controller:user');
var post = container.lookup('controller:post');

user.router instanceof Router; //=> true
post.router instanceof Router; //=> true

// both controllers share the same router
user.router === post.router; //=> true

Parameters:

type String
property String
fullName String

unregister

(fullName)

Unregister a fullName

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var container = new Container();
container.register('model:user', User);

container.lookup('model:user') instanceof User //=> true

container.unregister('model:user')
container.lookup('model:user') === undefined //=> true

Parameters:

fullName String

willDestroy

Override to implement teardown.

willMergeMixin

private

Moves actions to _actions at extend time. Note that this currently modifies the mixin themselves, which is technically dubious but is practically of little consequence. This may change in the future.

Show:

_options

InheritingDict private

Default: null

_typeOptions

InheritingDict private

actions

Hash

The collection of functions, keyed by name, available on this ActionHandler as action targets.

These functions will be invoked when a matching {{action}} is triggered from within a template and the application's current route is this route.

Actions can also be invoked from other parts of your application via ActionHandler#send.

The actions hash will inherit action handlers from the actions hash defined on extended parent classes or mixins rather than just replace the entire hash, e.g.:

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App.CanDisplayBanner = Ember.Mixin.create({
  actions: {
    displayBanner: function(msg) {
      // ...
    }
  }
});

App.WelcomeRoute = Ember.Route.extend(App.CanDisplayBanner, {
  actions: {
    playMusic: function() {
      // ...
    }
  }
});

// `WelcomeRoute`, when active, will be able to respond
// to both actions, since the actions hash is merged rather
// then replaced when extending mixins / parent classes.
this.send('displayBanner');
this.send('playMusic');

Within a Controller, Route, View or Component's action handler, the value of the this context is the Controller, Route, View or Component object:

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App.SongRoute = Ember.Route.extend({
  actions: {
    myAction: function() {
      this.controllerFor("song");
      this.transitionTo("other.route");
      ...
    }
  }
});

It is also possible to call this._super() from within an action handler if it overrides a handler defined on a parent class or mixin:

Take for example the following routes:

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App.DebugRoute = Ember.Mixin.create({
  actions: {
    debugRouteInformation: function() {
      console.debug("trololo");
    }
  }
});

App.AnnoyingDebugRoute = Ember.Route.extend(App.DebugRoute, {
  actions: {
    debugRouteInformation: function() {
      // also call the debugRouteInformation of mixed in App.DebugRoute
      this._super();

      // show additional annoyance
      window.alert(...);
    }
  }
});

Bubbling

By default, an action will stop bubbling once a handler defined on the actions hash handles it. To continue bubbling the action, you must return true from the handler:

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App.Router.map(function() {
  this.resource("album", function() {
    this.route("song");
  });
});

App.AlbumRoute = Ember.Route.extend({
  actions: {
    startPlaying: function() {
    }
  }
});

App.AlbumSongRoute = Ember.Route.extend({
  actions: {
    startPlaying: function() {
      // ...

      if (actionShouldAlsoBeTriggeredOnParentRoute) {
        return true;
      }
    }
  }
});

Default: null

cache

InheritingDict

children

Array

Default: []

concatenatedProperties

Array

Defines the properties that will be concatenated from the superclass (instead of overridden).

By default, when you extend an Ember class a property defined in the subclass overrides a property with the same name that is defined in the superclass. However, there are some cases where it is preferable to build up a property's value by combining the superclass' property value with the subclass' value. An example of this in use within Ember is the classNames property of Ember.View.

Here is some sample code showing the difference between a concatenated property and a normal one:

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App.BarView = Ember.View.extend({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['bar'],
  classNames: ['bar']
});

App.FooBarView = App.BarView.extend({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['foo'],
  classNames: ['foo']
});

var fooBarView = App.FooBarView.create();
fooBarView.get('someNonConcatenatedProperty'); // ['foo']
fooBarView.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo']

This behavior extends to object creation as well. Continuing the above example:

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var view = App.FooBarView.create({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['baz'],
  classNames: ['baz']
})
view.get('someNonConcatenatedProperty'); // ['baz']
view.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo', 'baz']

Adding a single property that is not an array will just add it in the array:

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var view = App.FooBarView.create({
  classNames: 'baz'
})
view.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo', 'baz']

Using the concatenatedProperties property, we can tell to Ember that mix the content of the properties.

In Ember.View the classNameBindings and attributeBindings properties are also concatenated, in addition to classNames.

This feature is available for you to use throughout the Ember object model, although typical app developers are likely to use it infrequently. Since it changes expectations about behavior of properties, you should properly document its usage in each individual concatenated property (to not mislead your users to think they can override the property in a subclass).

Default: null

content

Ember.Object

The object whose properties will be forwarded.

Default: null

controllers

Object

Stores the instances of other controllers available from within this controller. Any controller listed by name in the needs property will be accessible by name through this property.

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App.CommentsController = Ember.ArrayController.extend({
  needs: ['post'],
  postTitle: function(){
    var currentPost = this.get('controllers.post'); // instance of App.PostController
    return currentPost.get('title');
  }.property('controllers.post.title')
});

Default: null

dict

Object

Object used to store the current nodes data.

Default: Object

injections

Object

Default: {}

isDestroyed

Destroyed object property flag.

if this property is true the observers and bindings were already removed by the effect of calling the destroy() method.

Default: false

isDestroying

Destruction scheduled flag. The destroy() method has been called.

The object stays intact until the end of the run loop at which point the isDestroyed flag is set.

Default: false

model

public

The controller's current model. When retrieving or modifying a controller's model, this property should be used instead of the content property.

needs

Array

An array of other controller objects available inside instances of this controller via the controllers property:

For example, when you define a controller:

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App.CommentsController = Ember.ArrayController.extend({
  needs: ['post']
});

The application's single instance of these other controllers are accessible by name through the controllers property:

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this.get('controllers.post'); // instance of App.PostController

Given that you have a nested controller (nested resource):

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App.CommentsNewController = Ember.ObjectController.extend({
});

When you define a controller that requires access to a nested one:

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App.IndexController = Ember.ObjectController.extend({
  needs: ['commentsNew']
});

You will be able to get access to it:

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this.get('controllers.commentsNew'); // instance of App.CommentsNewController

This is only available for singleton controllers.

Default: []

parent

InheritingDict

Default: null

registry

InheritingDict

resolver

function

target

The object to which actions from the view should be sent.

For example, when a Handlebars template uses the {{action}} helper, it will attempt to send the action to the view's controller's target.

By default, the value of the target property is set to the router, and is injected when a controller is instantiated. This injection is defined in Ember.Application#buildContainer, and is applied as part of the applications initialization process. It can also be set after a controller has been instantiated, for instance when using the render helper in a template, or when a controller is used as an itemController. In most cases the target property will automatically be set to the logical consumer of actions for the controller.

Default: null

typeInjections

InheritingDict