Ember.Router Class packages/ember-routing/lib/system/router.js:34


The Ember.Router class manages the application state and URLs. Refer to the routing guide for documentation.

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_scheduledDestroy

private

Invoked by the run loop to actually destroy the object. This is scheduled for execution by the destroy method.

addObserver

(key, target, method)

Adds an observer on a property.

This is the core method used to register an observer for a property.

Once you call this method, any time the key's value is set, your observer will be notified. Note that the observers are triggered any time the value is set, regardless of whether it has actually changed. Your observer should be prepared to handle that.

You can also pass an optional context parameter to this method. The context will be passed to your observer method whenever it is triggered. Note that if you add the same target/method pair on a key multiple times with different context parameters, your observer will only be called once with the last context you passed.

Observer Methods

Observer methods you pass should generally have the following signature if you do not pass a context parameter:

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fooDidChange: function(sender, key, value, rev) { };

The sender is the object that changed. The key is the property that changes. The value property is currently reserved and unused. The rev is the last property revision of the object when it changed, which you can use to detect if the key value has really changed or not.

If you pass a context parameter, the context will be passed before the revision like so:

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fooDidChange: function(sender, key, value, context, rev) { };

Usually you will not need the value, context or revision parameters at the end. In this case, it is common to write observer methods that take only a sender and key value as parameters or, if you aren't interested in any of these values, to write an observer that has no parameters at all.

Parameters:

key String
The key to observer
target Object
The target object to invoke
method String|Function
The method to invoke.

beginPropertyChanges

Ember.Observable

Begins a grouping of property changes.

You can use this method to group property changes so that notifications will not be sent until the changes are finished. If you plan to make a large number of changes to an object at one time, you should call this method at the beginning of the changes to begin deferring change notifications. When you are done making changes, call endPropertyChanges() to deliver the deferred change notifications and end deferring.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

cacheFor

(keyName) Object

Returns the cached value of a computed property, if it exists. This allows you to inspect the value of a computed property without accidentally invoking it if it is intended to be generated lazily.

Parameters:

keyName String

Returns:

Object
The cached value of the computed property, if any

create

(arguments) static

Creates an instance of a class. Accepts either no arguments, or an object containing values to initialize the newly instantiated object with.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  helloWorld: function() {
    alert("Hi, my name is " + this.get('name'));
  }
});

var tom = App.Person.create({
  name: 'Tom Dale'
});

tom.helloWorld(); // alerts "Hi, my name is Tom Dale".

create will call the init function if defined during Ember.AnyObject.extend

If no arguments are passed to create, it will not set values to the new instance during initialization:

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var noName = App.Person.create();
noName.helloWorld(); // alerts undefined

NOTE: For performance reasons, you cannot declare methods or computed properties during create. You should instead declare methods and computed properties when using extend or use the createWithMixins shorthand.

Parameters:

arguments []

createWithMixins

(arguments) static

Equivalent to doing extend(arguments).create(). If possible use the normal create method instead.

Parameters:

arguments []

decrementProperty

(keyName, decrement) Number

Set the value of a property to the current value minus some amount.

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player.decrementProperty('lives');
orc.decrementProperty('health', 5);

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to decrement
decrement Number
The amount to decrement by. Defaults to 1

Returns:

Number
The new property value

destroy

Ember.Object

Destroys an object by setting the isDestroyed flag and removing its metadata, which effectively destroys observers and bindings.

If you try to set a property on a destroyed object, an exception will be raised.

Note that destruction is scheduled for the end of the run loop and does not happen immediately. It will set an isDestroying flag immediately.

Returns:

Ember.Object
receiver

didTransition

private
Defined in packages/ember-routing/lib/system/router.js:134
Available since 1.2.0

Handles updating the paths and notifying any listeners of the URL change.

Triggers the router level didTransition hook.

eachComputedProperty

(callback, binding)

Iterate over each computed property for the class, passing its name and any associated metadata (see metaForProperty) to the callback.

Parameters:

callback Function
binding Object

endPropertyChanges

Ember.Observable

Ends a grouping of property changes.

You can use this method to group property changes so that notifications will not be sent until the changes are finished. If you plan to make a large number of changes to an object at one time, you should call beginPropertyChanges() at the beginning of the changes to defer change notifications. When you are done making changes, call this method to deliver the deferred change notifications and end deferring.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

extend

(mixins, arguments) static

Creates a new subclass.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    alert(thing);
   }
});

This defines a new subclass of Ember.Object: App.Person. It contains one method: say().

You can also create a subclass from any existing class by calling its extend() method. For example, you might want to create a subclass of Ember's built-in Ember.View class:

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App.PersonView = Ember.View.extend({
  tagName: 'li',
  classNameBindings: ['isAdministrator']
});

When defining a subclass, you can override methods but still access the implementation of your parent class by calling the special _super() method:

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    var name = this.get('name');
    alert(name + ' says: ' + thing);
  }
});

App.Soldier = App.Person.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    this._super(thing + ", sir!");
  },
  march: function(numberOfHours) {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' marches for ' + numberOfHours + ' hours.')
  }
});

var yehuda = App.Soldier.create({
  name: "Yehuda Katz"
});

yehuda.say("Yes");  // alerts "Yehuda Katz says: Yes, sir!"

The create() on line #17 creates an instance of the App.Soldier class. The extend() on line #8 creates a subclass of App.Person. Any instance of the App.Person class will not have the march() method.

You can also pass Mixin classes to add additional properties to the subclass.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  say: function(thing) {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' says: ' + thing);
  }
});

App.SingingMixin = Mixin.create({
  sing: function(thing){
    alert(this.get('name') + ' sings: la la la ' + thing);
  }
});

App.BroadwayStar = App.Person.extend(App.SingingMixin, {
  dance: function() {
    alert(this.get('name') + ' dances: tap tap tap tap ');
  }
});

The App.BroadwayStar class contains three methods: say(), sing(), and dance().

Parameters:

mixins [Mixin]
One or more Mixin classes
arguments [Object]
Object containing values to use within the new class

get

(keyName) Object

Retrieves the value of a property from the object.

This method is usually similar to using object[keyName] or object.keyName, however it supports both computed properties and the unknownProperty handler.

Because get unifies the syntax for accessing all these kinds of properties, it can make many refactorings easier, such as replacing a simple property with a computed property, or vice versa.

Computed Properties

Computed properties are methods defined with the property modifier declared at the end, such as:

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fullName: function() {
  return this.get('firstName') + ' ' + this.get('lastName');
}.property('firstName', 'lastName')

When you call get on a computed property, the function will be called and the return value will be returned instead of the function itself.

Unknown Properties

Likewise, if you try to call get on a property whose value is undefined, the unknownProperty() method will be called on the object. If this method returns any value other than undefined, it will be returned instead. This allows you to implement "virtual" properties that are not defined upfront.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property to retrieve

Returns:

Object
The property value or undefined.

getProperties

(list) Hash

To get the values of multiple properties at once, call getProperties with a list of strings or an array:

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record.getProperties('firstName', 'lastName', 'zipCode');
// { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe', zipCode: '10011' }

is equivalent to:

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record.getProperties(['firstName', 'lastName', 'zipCode']);
// { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe', zipCode: '10011' }

Parameters:

list String...|Array
of keys to get

Returns:

Hash

getWithDefault

(keyName, defaultValue) Object

Retrieves the value of a property, or a default value in the case that the property returns undefined.

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person.getWithDefault('lastName', 'Doe');

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to retrieve
defaultValue Object
The value to return if the property value is undefined

Returns:

Object
The property value or the defaultValue.

hasObserverFor

(key) Boolean

Returns true if the object currently has observers registered for a particular key. You can use this method to potentially defer performing an expensive action until someone begins observing a particular property on the object.

Parameters:

key String
Key to check

Returns:

Boolean

hasRoute

Boolean private

Does this router instance have the given route.

Returns:

Boolean

incrementProperty

(keyName, increment) Number

Set the value of a property to the current value plus some amount.

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person.incrementProperty('age');
team.incrementProperty('score', 2);

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to increment
increment Number
The amount to increment by. Defaults to 1

Returns:

Number
The new property value

init

An overridable method called when objects are instantiated. By default, does nothing unless it is overridden during class definition.

Example:

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  init: function() {
    alert('Name is ' + this.get('name'));
  }
});

var steve = App.Person.create({
  name: "Steve"
});

// alerts 'Name is Steve'.

NOTE: If you do override init for a framework class like Ember.View or Ember.ArrayController, be sure to call this._super() in your init declaration! If you don't, Ember may not have an opportunity to do important setup work, and you'll see strange behavior in your application.

isActive

(routeName) Boolean private

Determines if the supplied route is currently active.

Parameters:

routeName

Returns:

Boolean

isActiveIntent

(routeName, models, queryParams) Boolean private
Defined in packages/ember-routing/lib/system/router.js:223
Available since 1.7.0

An alternative form of isActive that doesn't require manual concatenation of the arguments into a single array.

Parameters:

routeName
models
queryParams

Returns:

Boolean

lazyInjections

Object

Returns a hash of property names and container names that injected properties will lookup on the container lazily.

Returns:

Object
Hash of all lazy injected property keys to container names

map

(callback)

The Router.map function allows you to define mappings from URLs to routes and resources in your application. These mappings are defined within the supplied callback function using this.resource and this.route.

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App.Router.map(function({
  this.route('about');
  this.resource('article');
}));

For more detailed examples please see the guides.

Parameters:

callback

metaForProperty

(key)

In some cases, you may want to annotate computed properties with additional metadata about how they function or what values they operate on. For example, computed property functions may close over variables that are then no longer available for introspection.

You can pass a hash of these values to a computed property like this:

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person: function() {
  var personId = this.get('personId');
  return App.Person.create({ id: personId });
}.property().meta({ type: App.Person })

Once you've done this, you can retrieve the values saved to the computed property from your class like this:

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MyClass.metaForProperty('person');

This will return the original hash that was passed to meta().

Parameters:

key String
property name

notifyPropertyChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Convenience method to call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange in succession.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key to be notified about.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

propertyDidChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Notify the observer system that a property has just changed.

Sometimes you need to change a value directly or indirectly without actually calling get() or set() on it. In this case, you can use this method and propertyWillChange() instead. Calling these two methods together will notify all observers that the property has potentially changed value.

Note that you must always call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange as a pair. If you do not, it may get the property change groups out of order and cause notifications to be delivered more often than you would like.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key that has just changed.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

propertyWillChange

(keyName) Ember.Observable

Notify the observer system that a property is about to change.

Sometimes you need to change a value directly or indirectly without actually calling get() or set() on it. In this case, you can use this method and propertyDidChange() instead. Calling these two methods together will notify all observers that the property has potentially changed value.

Note that you must always call propertyWillChange and propertyDidChange as a pair. If you do not, it may get the property change groups out of order and cause notifications to be delivered more often than you would like.

Parameters:

keyName String
The property key that is about to change.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

removeObserver

(key, target, method)

Remove an observer you have previously registered on this object. Pass the same key, target, and method you passed to addObserver() and your target will no longer receive notifications.

Parameters:

key String
The key to observer
target Object
The target object to invoke
method String|Function
The method to invoke.

reopen

Augments a constructor's prototype with additional properties and functions:

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MyObject = Ember.Object.extend({
  name: 'an object'
});

o = MyObject.create();
o.get('name'); // 'an object'

MyObject.reopen({
  say: function(msg){
    console.log(msg);
  }
})

o2 = MyObject.create();
o2.say("hello"); // logs "hello"

o.say("goodbye"); // logs "goodbye"

To add functions and properties to the constructor itself, see reopenClass

reopenClass

Augments a constructor's own properties and functions:

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MyObject = Ember.Object.extend({
  name: 'an object'
});

MyObject.reopenClass({
  canBuild: false
});

MyObject.canBuild; // false
o = MyObject.create();

In other words, this creates static properties and functions for the class. These are only available on the class and not on any instance of that class.

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App.Person = Ember.Object.extend({
  name : "",
  sayHello : function(){
    alert("Hello. My name is " + this.get('name'));
  }
});

App.Person.reopenClass({
  species : "Homo sapiens",
  createPerson: function(newPersonsName){
    return App.Person.create({
      name:newPersonsName
    });
  }
});

var tom = App.Person.create({
  name : "Tom Dale"
});
var yehuda = App.Person.createPerson("Yehuda Katz");

tom.sayHello(); // "Hello. My name is Tom Dale"
yehuda.sayHello(); // "Hello. My name is Yehuda Katz"
alert(App.Person.species); // "Homo sapiens"

Note that species and createPerson are not valid on the tom and yehuda variables. They are only valid on App.Person.

To add functions and properties to instances of a constructor by extending the constructor's prototype see reopen

reset

private

Resets the state of the router by clearing the current route handlers and deactivating them.

set

(keyName, value) Ember.Observable

Sets the provided key or path to the value.

This method is generally very similar to calling object[key] = value or object.key = value, except that it provides support for computed properties, the setUnknownProperty() method and property observers.

Computed Properties

If you try to set a value on a key that has a computed property handler defined (see the get() method for an example), then set() will call that method, passing both the value and key instead of simply changing the value itself. This is useful for those times when you need to implement a property that is composed of one or more member properties.

Unknown Properties

If you try to set a value on a key that is undefined in the target object, then the setUnknownProperty() handler will be called instead. This gives you an opportunity to implement complex "virtual" properties that are not predefined on the object. If setUnknownProperty() returns undefined, then set() will simply set the value on the object.

Property Observers

In addition to changing the property, set() will also register a property change with the object. Unless you have placed this call inside of a beginPropertyChanges() and endPropertyChanges(), any "local" observers (i.e. observer methods declared on the same object), will be called immediately. Any "remote" observers (i.e. observer methods declared on another object) will be placed in a queue and called at a later time in a coalesced manner.

Chaining

In addition to property changes, set() returns the value of the object itself so you can do chaining like this:

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record.set('firstName', 'Charles').set('lastName', 'Jolley');

Parameters:

keyName String
The property to set
value Object
The value to set or `null`.

Returns:

Ember.Observable

setProperties

(hash) Ember.Observable

Sets a list of properties at once. These properties are set inside a single beginPropertyChanges and endPropertyChanges batch, so observers will be buffered.

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record.setProperties({ firstName: 'Charles', lastName: 'Jolley' });

Parameters:

hash Hash
the hash of keys and values to set

Returns:

Ember.Observable

startRouting

private

Initializes the current router instance and sets up the change handling event listeners used by the instances location implementation.

A property named initialURL will be used to determine the initial URL. If no value is found / will be used.

toString

String

Returns a string representation which attempts to provide more information than Javascript's toString typically does, in a generic way for all Ember objects.

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App.Person = Em.Object.extend()
person = App.Person.create()
person.toString() //=> "<App.Person:ember1024>"

If the object's class is not defined on an Ember namespace, it will indicate it is a subclass of the registered superclass:

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Student = App.Person.extend()
student = Student.create()
student.toString() //=> "<(subclass of App.Person):ember1025>"

If the method toStringExtension is defined, its return value will be included in the output.

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App.Teacher = App.Person.extend({
  toStringExtension: function() {
    return this.get('fullName');
  }
});
teacher = App.Teacher.create()
teacher.toString(); //=> "<App.Teacher:ember1026:Tom Dale>"

Returns:

String
string representation

toggleProperty

(keyName) Object

Set the value of a boolean property to the opposite of it's current value.

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starship.toggleProperty('warpDriveEngaged');

Parameters:

keyName String
The name of the property to toggle

Returns:

Object
The new property value

url

String

Represents the current URL.

Returns:

String
The current URL.

willDestroy

Override to implement teardown.

willMergeMixin

private

Provides mixin-time validation for injected properties.

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concatenatedProperties

Array

Defines the properties that will be concatenated from the superclass (instead of overridden).

By default, when you extend an Ember class a property defined in the subclass overrides a property with the same name that is defined in the superclass. However, there are some cases where it is preferable to build up a property's value by combining the superclass' property value with the subclass' value. An example of this in use within Ember is the classNames property of Ember.View.

Here is some sample code showing the difference between a concatenated property and a normal one:

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App.BarView = Ember.View.extend({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['bar'],
  classNames: ['bar']
});

App.FooBarView = App.BarView.extend({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['foo'],
  classNames: ['foo']
});

var fooBarView = App.FooBarView.create();
fooBarView.get('someNonConcatenatedProperty'); // ['foo']
fooBarView.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo']

This behavior extends to object creation as well. Continuing the above example:

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var view = App.FooBarView.create({
  someNonConcatenatedProperty: ['baz'],
  classNames: ['baz']
})
view.get('someNonConcatenatedProperty'); // ['baz']
view.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo', 'baz']

Adding a single property that is not an array will just add it in the array:

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var view = App.FooBarView.create({
  classNames: 'baz'
})
view.get('classNames'); // ['ember-view', 'bar', 'foo', 'baz']

Using the concatenatedProperties property, we can tell to Ember that mix the content of the properties.

In Ember.View the classNameBindings and attributeBindings properties are also concatenated, in addition to classNames.

This feature is available for you to use throughout the Ember object model, although typical app developers are likely to use it infrequently. Since it changes expectations about behavior of properties, you should properly document its usage in each individual concatenated property (to not mislead your users to think they can override the property in a subclass).

Default: null

isDestroyed

Destroyed object property flag.

if this property is true the observers and bindings were already removed by the effect of calling the destroy() method.

Default: false

isDestroying

Destruction scheduled flag. The destroy() method has been called.

The object stays intact until the end of the run loop at which point the isDestroyed flag is set.

Default: false

location

The location property determines the type of URL's that your application will use.

The following location types are currently available:

  • hash
  • history
  • none

Default: 'hash'

rootURL

Represents the URL of the root of the application, often '/'. This prefix is assumed on all routes defined on this router.

Default: '/'