Roadmap

Ember's 2018 Roadmap: A Call for Blog Posts

Ember has been humming along for years, with direction set by the core team, based on their instincts, experiences, and community interactions. And it's worked well!

As our community grows though, the sheer volume of good ideas makes it hard to rely...

Community Update from the Learning Team

Each Ember team meets in person at EmberConf. For many of us, it was our first chance to sit down in person and plan together! This is important for us because it allows us spend an entire day getting to know each other and plan for the upcoming year...

The Road to Ember 3.0

Today the Ember.js Core Team is happy to announce our plans for the release of Ember 3.0. Ember 3.0 will arrive 2.5 years and 18 minor revisions after the release of Ember 2.0. The final release of the 2.x series will be Ember 2.18 on January 1st,...

EmberConf 2017: State of the Union

Ember.js (or should we say Amber.js) turned five years old last December. In some ways, five years is a short amount of time. But when measured in web framework years, it feels like a downright eternity.

As Yehuda and I were getting ready for our...

Introducing Subteams

I'm very happy to share with you our plan to scale Ember's day-to-day decision-making and coordination—something we're calling Subteams. We mentioned some of this in this year's EmberConf keynote, and wanted to expand on the specific details.

Ember...

Announcing Ember's First LTS Release

Currently, Ember uses release channels to help users balance between a desire for new features (canary or beta channels) with stability (the release channel). While semver guarantees mean that upgrades are quite straightforward, some users aren't able...

The Road to Ember Data 1.0

TL;DR Ember Data 1.0 is coming soon. We have a few last features to land before we can confidently make guarantees around not breaking the API. Specifically:

  1. A guarantee that if one side of a two-way relationship changes, the other side will remain...